The adjective ‘achromatic’ is taken directly from the French word ‘achromatique’, which in turn comes from the Greeks’ ‘a-‘ (without) and ‘khrōmatikos’ (deriving from ‘khrōma’, meaning colour). Put simply, achromatic means ‘without colour’.

And while a coloured scheme can cause all kind of headaches, a colour-free interior isn’t always black and white (haha). Pulling off a successful achromatic space takes talent and restraint, and we’ve found five fantastic examples where designers have nailed the greys.

A gorgeous Tundra Grey marble takes centre stage in this kitchen designed by Kia Howat (GIA Bathrooms & Kitchens). The Melbourne designer paired the stunning stone with Dulux Terrace White 2 pack cabinetry, and added contrast with a feature tower in Empire Oak Woodmatt. Sitting on French Oak floors, the kitchen is an excellent example of achromatic style.

New South Wales designer, Catherine Young, teamed with The Renovation Broker to create this clever kitchen space. Abundant natural light allowed the designer to play with a deeply toned achromatic palette: the flat matt Nero porcelain benchtops make a striking statement and work well with the charcoal cabinetry. Nordic Oak Woodmatt panels add warmth and contrast, while small hex mosaics inject texture and a bit of bling.

Backlit New York Marble is the highlight of this dynamic kitchen by Sydney’s Matt Michel (Matt Michel Design). Alpine Matte benchtops and a dark and moody Hamilton Plains veneer allow the heavily patterned stone to sing, and make the kitchen both balanced and beautiful.

Melbourne’s Alicia Jeffries (Mint Kitchen Group) made a major statement with this natural granite (Super White) island. The island top and waterfall ends wrap around Dulux Domino panels, creating a well-balanced feature in a remarkable space.

Essastone Luna Concrete is the centrepiece of this elegant kitchen designed by Tasmania’s Lydia Maskiell (Lydia Maskiell Interiors). Prime Oak Woodmatt detailing injects warmth and texture into the achromatic space, and white satin cabinets and panels reflect the glorious natural light spilling into the kitchen.

Have a favourite out of the five kitchens above? Share your feedback below.