In this article, Ron Redman (Redman Training & Development) shares some timely perspectives on reacting to stressful situations.

As we approach the end of 2019, I’m sure many would reflect on ‘what a year it has been!’.

For Debra and I, 2019 has presented an array of feelings, experiences and life lessons, along with unforgettably joyful moments.

Our business, Redman Training & Development – still in its infancy – has provided us with wonderful challenges and at the same time, fulfilment. We are grateful to all the workshop participants, industry groups such as KBDi and our individual coaching clients for the trust they have placed in us. 

We have also been faced with stress through various situations: workshop equipment not working as expected, rooms and resources unavailable, flight delays … and I could go on.

With regard to the last mentioned challenge, my flight to Sydney this week was delayed through a technical problem. In that moment of announcement, I had a choice of how I would respond or behave. (Refer our article on choice published in KBDi earlier this year). 

My choice was to either get angry, or accept the situation as out of my control, then place trust in the fault being rectified as quickly as possible. Personally, I would much prefer any problem with an aircraft being attended to prior to take-off rather than at 10,000 metres up. 

Being a bit of a ‘people person’, I found it interesting to observe how some other passengers in the lounge responded to the news. I must say the majority responded well with little sign of stress.

There were some, however, who were noticeably agitated and stressed. Now, I am not going to negatively judge their behaviour. I had no idea of their personal circumstances and in that moment their situation may well have held very concerning issues. These people were stressed, and their day and interactions would be effected accordingly.

On a positive note, what I did observe was quite a number of passengers using the time productively: connecting with others, possibly people they had never met now thrown in to a commonly shared experience. Others like me used the time to make some overdue phone calls, catch up with some tasks. It’s amazing how much can be achieved in an airport lounge.

Reflecting back on this experience, my choice to trust and not let the situation place me under stress resulted in a very productive day. The plans I had were rescheduled or dealt with over the phone.

I have arrived at an understanding that the level of stress we experience is self-imposed. Research from many neurological sources tells us that a certain level of stress, called Eu-stress, is a normal part of life and can positively motivate us to take an action, however, if we allow our stress levels to get out of control we become de-motivated resulting in not achieving our desired goals and outcomes.

We appeal to all not to let stress impact on your opportunity this year to have valuable connection time with family and friends this holiday period.

There is valuable support available through many well publicised sources. You only need to have the courage to ask for it.

Our wish to all who read this, all of our friends and contacts within the Australian Kitchen, Bathroom and Furniture industry is for a joyous stress-free holiday period.

We look forward to being of service in 2020. 

Debra & Ron Redman

Redman Training & Development

E:info@redmantd.com.au

Ph: +61411720954