A close up look at laundries

A close up look at laundries

Tuesday | 31 August 2021 | 4 pm AEST

We’ll kick off this week’s session with an up-close look at the entry of KBDi Designer Awards Design Space (Laundries) winner, Katherine Siketa. Katherine will walk us through her entry and share the back story behind this beautiful space. We’ll also discuss the key things all designers need to consider when planning a laundry space, from material selection to ventilation and relevant code requirements.

 

Watch the recording

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Lovely laundries in Design Space line up

Lovely laundries in Design Space line up

A lovely laundry can make a big difference to the quality of one’s life.

This much-used room should be functional, well-designed and aesthetically pleasing; the finalists below have certainly ticked all of these boxes.

The KBDi Designer Awards Design Space (Laundries) category is proudly sponsored by Cabinet Makers Insurance Brokers. On behalf of CMIB, we wish each of the finalists the best of luck, and look forward to announcing the winner on Friday, 20 August.

Features and benefits of solid surfaces

Features and benefits of solid surfaces

As we look for ways to impress and service our clients, it’s essential to be informed about the features, benefits and design considerations of a wide range of products. With an in-depth knowledge of surfaces and materials, you’ll be better placed to extend your design potential in kitchen and bathroom design. In our new Design Bulletins, we’re helping you build a bank of references to start your material investigations. In this month’s product highlight bulletin, we’ve partnered with Austaron Surfaces to outline the features and benefits of Staron® Solid Surfaces.

The Bulletin summarises how solid surfaces can be used in all kinds of kitchen and bathroom applications. It outlines the key considerations you need to make when designing with solid surfaces, including support and structural requirements, designing with pattern and selecting colours. Most importantly, this handy cheat-sheet sets out the compliance and warranties associated with the product, making it an invaluable resource for all good designers.

Members can access this Design Bulletin (along with our full suite of Technical and Business Bulletins) in our exclusive Members Portal. Simply click on the Members Portal tab at the top of your screen and log in to your account. (If you’ve not yet registered for an account, this process is straightforward: simply complete the details where prompted and we’ll set you up.)

Not yet a KBDi Member but keen to learn more? Complete the form below and we’ll be in touch.

Power outlets and switches in bathrooms

Power outlets and switches in bathrooms

Power and water can be a dangerous combination, and their relative proximity is a critical consideration to be made when designing bathrooms, laundries and kitchens. In this technical bulletin, we’ll break down the relevant legislation and outline where power outlets, switches and luminaires should be avoided in residential bathrooms. Request your copy by submitting the form below.

Request for Technical Bulletin

Request for Technical Bulletin

Grout lines and tile layouts

Grout lines and tile layouts

While grouting is not always discussed in great depth at the design consultancy stage, it is frequently a point of contention when the tiling work is finished. Most tile retailers will confirm that ‘misaligned grout lines’ is their number one consumer complaint.

We’ve create a Technical Bulletin to help you keep on top of your tiling layouts and avoid disputes down the track. The Bulletin answers questions like:

  • What is grout and why is necessary?
  • Why do joint widths (grout lines) matter?
  • What are the ‘rules’ around joint widths (Australian Standards)?

This Bulletin will be a great resource to add to your library. Complete the form below and we’ll verify your Membership and get a copy to you ASAP. Alternatively, use the link we sent you a little while back (emailed to Members last month) and you’ll get access to all of our 2019 Bulletins in your own time.

Request for Technical Bulletin

Documenting the details: ‘three C tips’ for exceptional documentation

Documenting the details: ‘three C tips’ for exceptional documentation

Design Rule #1: a well-thought-out design won’t become a reality if it’s not documented clearly.

Clear, concise and consistent technical drawings allow you to communicate your design intent, and ensure your ideas aren’t left open to vague interpretation by others. Here are our ‘three C tips’ for exceptional documentation.

C#1 Clarity

Technical drawing is first and foremost a communication tool – think of it as a language that everyone should be able to understand. By delivering clear and consistent plans, your designs will be better understood, and you won’t need to explain your intentions repeatedly. To keep your drawing set crystal clear:

  • ‘Plan your plans’ in advance: map out your floor plan, elevations, mechanical/structural plans, sections and 3D renderings, and use clearly set out call-outs (symbols) and references to lead the reader fluently from one drawing to another.
  • Plan each individual drawing before getting into the detail; ensure the layout is logical and clear – don’t be afraid of white space.
  • Consider how your plans will be read: will the reader be printing them out (A4? A3? A0?) or view them on an on-site iPad or in-house big screen monitor? Can your drawings be easily deciphered when reduced or enlarged?

C#2 Conciseness

Many designers think their intentions will be made more apparent with copious notes, but this is not always the case. Consider the following when aiming for concise documentation:

  • Be consistent with layouts, linework, dimensioning, abbreviations and symbols (using Australian Standards – see below – and your own quality control checklist). Avoid long blocks of text, and embrace white space!
  • Include a legend to decipher the meaning of abbreviations and symbols.
  • Back up your plan set with a comprehensive specification (in table format) and a visual finishes locater (rendered 3D plan or marked up elevations, for example) and you’ll ensure everyone is on the same page.

C#3 Consistency

If you’re looking for consistency and clarity in your technical drawings, Australian Standards are a useful reference. Using AS 1100.101-1992 (R2014) Technical Drawing General Principles as a starting point for your own in-house quality control checklist will make sure you’re on the right track.

  • AS 1100 sets out the basic principles of technical drawing, including:
  • common abbreviations
  • sizes and layout of drawing sheets
  • types and thicknesses of lines to be used (with examples of application)
  • recommendations for uniform letters, numerals and symbols
  • recommended scales and their applications
  • methods of projection and indication of various views (elevations etc.)
  • means of indicating sections, and conventions used in sectioning details
  • recommendations for dimensioning including size and geometry tolerances
  • protocols used for the representation of components

AS 1100.301-2008 Technical Drawing Architectural Drawing is another useful Standard. It covers methods of presenting architectural drawings before, during and after the construction period. The Standard includes information on additional abbreviations, drawing sheet layouts, line conventions and protocols for cross-referencing drawings, coordinates and grids.

You’ll find copies of the above Standards in your local library. If you feel the full volume would be a good addition to your library, visit www.saiglobal.com for information on purchasing your own. And of course, as a KBDi Member, you can always reach out to us for specific areas of advice.

By following our three Cs, your design details will be a dream for the people turning your big ideas into reality.